College Boxing. { EDITORIAL }

Some names you should remember:

Stacy Sakamoto.
Dick Marshall.
Stacy’s the producer/writer of this story. Dick’s the photographer, employing XDCam, GoPro, Canon Powershot, and an iPhone.
By the time they were done, here’s what was supposed to happen: a 3-1/2 minute cut  completed in 12-16 hours. Instead, the cut had to be 5-1/2 minutes done in 8 hours.
That’s right: more content… and less time to cut it.
The question was, just how much impact would the loss of edit time have on the finished product?
Okay so Dick gave me tons of great stuff. I actually took time to skim through every clip, tagging as I went, before working the timeline. I quickly discovered the GoPro footage was AWOL. No kidding. Fortunately, Stacy took it upon herself to hunt it down for me.
As scripted, the story’s open featured a mix of the actual fight night and practice bouts. I leaned hard into the fight night footage alone; it was so loaded with energy.
The script also featured the deep, emotional moments two of the boxers experienced. It gave me an opportunity to get out of the way as an editor and let the moments play for all they were worth. And they were worth plenty.
Finally, I misjudged the amount of time it would take to cut the two fight sequences and actually cut around them in case I had to hand the edit over to another editor.
But, turns out the magic number was 30.
Thirty minutes to cut the fight sequences. Go figure.
The story on the photograph that ends this piece is that by the time the team assembled for a group shot, Stacy and Dick had already packed up their gear. So with no time to unpack anything, they used an iPhone to capture this final moment and, at the end of the edit, Stacy emailed it to me from her phone.
And that was that.
Magic.
🙂

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Swiss Bobsledding. { EDITORIAL | COMPOSER }

Some names you should remember:

Stacy Sakamoto.
Dick Marshall.
Stacy’s the producer/writer of this story. Dick’s the photographer, employing XDCam, GoPro, Canon Powershot, and an iPhone.
By the time they were done, here’s what was supposed to happen: a 3-1/2 minute cut  completed in 12-16 hours. Instead, the cut had to be 5-1/2 minutes done in 8 hours.
That’s right: more content… and less time to cut it.
The question was, just how much impact would the loss of edit time have on the finished product?
Okay so Dick gave me tons of great stuff. I actually took time to skim through every clip, tagging as I went, before working the timeline. I quickly discovered the GoPro footage was AWOL. No kidding. Fortunately, Stacy took it upon herself to hunt it down for me.
As scripted, the story’s open featu

Adventure Costa Rica. Whitewater rapids. { EDITORIAL | COMPOSER | PERFORMER }

Some sequences are mixed blessings.
What else do you call an amazing opportunity to cut a wild river rapids adventure featuring footage from an HDcam, three HDV cameras, and three GoPros?
That’s HOURS of footage, my friends, for roughly two minutes of screen time.
Because we had a longer deadline for this show, and because I was paranoid about missing out on any sound or visual element that would amaze… I watched everything.
Seriously. Everything.
This was one of the few times I tagged and sorted all the footage of a sequence before cutting one frame. Which helped me identify all the pieces I needed to create epic wipe-outs… and provided a rough idea on how to structure the sequence.
At the same time I was sifting through the footage, I was also thinking through what role music would play.
I always knew, for example, that music should mimic the adventure itself: preparation, setting off, rapids, and quiet resolution.
In viewing the footage, I spotted what I needed to transition from one part of the adventure to the next; the guide yelling out in the open being the pivot from setting off to rapids, for example.
Of course all this meant that I indulged… a LOT. And the editor’s cut of this sequence went roughly 45 to a minute longer than what aired.
No worries, though. That longer cut lives on in DVD extras.
🙂